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Climate Change, Energy and Environment

Yvonne Blos (international)
+49 30 26935-7470
yvonne.blos(at)fes.de


Max Ostermayer (national)
030 26935-8319
Max.Ostermayer(at)fes.de

Combining Social and Ecological Responsibility

Climate change is real – and its effects can already be felt all around the world. In order to counteract the destruction of our planet, we need to live more sustainably and stop wasting resources. This will require enormous changes, such as moving away from fossil fuels like coal and towards low-emission power sources like wind or solar energy. This structural change has great potential – if it is shaped justly.

All over the world, we are advocates for a socio-ecological transition, which will be an answer to both the ecological and the social question. Our vision: Low-emission, resource-conserving and socially inclusive economic systems in which everybody has a chance for a decent life that is based on human rights principles. In order to facilitate this goal, we are building stable, broad and progressive coalitions between the ecological movement, politics and trade unions that pave the way towards a more sustainable future.

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Point of View

Our Six Messages for the International Climate and Energy Policy more


News About Climate Change, Energy and Environment

China’s latest carbon pledge sets ambitious course for the 21st Century

China’s recent commitment to reaching carbon neutrality by 2060 sends a powerful message, not only about what the country thinks it can achieve with...


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The Road Towards a Carbon Free Society

A Nordic-German Trade Union Cooperation on Just Transition. Six reports are presented and discussed in a series of events nationally as well as in...


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08.02.2021

The Knowledge of the Many

Civil society voices in national climate protection plans: perspectives from Kenya, Kirgizstan, Morocco and the Philippines.


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The case for social cities

Environmental disasters, a worldwide pandemic, looming recession and political turmoil shape Asia’s metropolises, making it clear why future cities...


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20.10.2020

The Future of the EU: Grasp the Opportunities of the Green Deal

by Frederik Moch


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More articles are available here.

Publikation

Climate Manual: Climate action. Socially. Just.

In our new manual, we present numerous arguments showing that social progress and ambitious climate action must go hand in hand. Enjoy reading! more

World Climate Conference

FES @ #COP

Where do we go now after the Paris Agreement? Assessments, analyses and contributions from young activists at the annual World Climate Conferences provide answers. more


Publications

Hochscheidt, Lukas; Wixforth, Susanne; Rohde, Jan Philipp

La transformación social-ecológica de la economía europea

Perspectivas sindicales
Berlin, 2021

Download publication (620 KB, PDF-File)


Ersoy, Sibel Raquel; Terrapon-Pfaff, Julia

Sustainable transformation of Algeria's energy system

Development of a phase model
Algiers, 2021

Download publication (1,2 MB PDF-File)


PEET - the Political Economy of Energy Transition in Southeast Europe

Barriers and obstacles
Sarajevo, 2021

Download publication (12 MB, PDF-File)


Kim, Huynwoo

Evaluation and recommendations about the carbon neutrality strategy of South Korea

Seoul, 2021

Download publication (880 KB, PDF-File)


Neefjes, Koos; Ngo Thi To Nhien

Prospects for a socially just energy transition in Viet Nam: 2021 and beyond

Hanoi, 2021

Download publication (3,8 MB, PDF-File)



Climate Change and Progressive Politics

Climate change is real – and its effects can already be felt all around the world. In order to counteract the destruction of our planet, we need to live more sustainably and stop wasting resources. This will require enormous changes, such as moving away from fossil fuels like coal and towards low-emission power sources like wind or solar energy. This structural change has great potential – if it is shaped justly.

With the Paris Agreement, the international community has acknowledged that we need a more sustainable economic system even to just slow global warming down. But a shift to more sustainability means much more than that: The socio-ecological transformation we are advocating for will make it possible to

  • reduce poverty and inequality;
  • boost economic growth through sustainable progress;
  • shape low-emission, resource-saving and socially inclusive economic systems;
  • treat human labor with care, respect and sustainability and
  • give everybody the chance for a decent life that is based on human rights standards.

Sustainability and Social Justice: Two Sides of the Same Coin

In the 21st century, the progressive concept of development combines social, economical and ecological responsibility. The ecological and the social question must be linked and answered together: Environmental protection and sustainability are issues that the ecological movement, but also trade unions and workers deal with. The Friedrich-Ebert-Foundation builds bridges between their often clashing positions – for stable, broad and progressive coalitions that pave the way towards a more sustainable future.

Social and Ecological Issues are One

When addressing, for instance, the abolishment of coal mining, our intent is not to pit “ecological interests” against “worker's interests”. Many people are justifiably afraid of losing their work and security as a result of such a structural change. It needs to be ensured that they have a future perspective that is not dependent on further environmental destruction. The road towards this goal is a rocky one, and this is exactly why we are developing our concepts and ideas: For a Just Transition that makes a more sustainable economic system and better prospects in life for everyone possible.

Climate Justice Worldwide

We want to shape climate justice in a socially just and compensatory way so that everyone profits from it in the end. Climate justice means that each and every person has the same right of use for the atmosphere, regardless of nationality, age, gender or religion. Climate justice requires that both the Global South and Global North, both younger generation's interests and the older generation's interests carry the same amount of weight. And climate justice also means that opportunities and burdens are fairly distributed around the world.

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