Bild: Time for Justice 2017 von FES 

Inequality – Discarded!

According to Oxfam, the eight richest persons in the world possess just as much wealth as the poorer half of humanity, i.e. 3.6 billion people. Other statistics also indicate that the gap between poor and rich is widening. By the same token, mounting inequality has dramatic repercussions: it jeopardises the political stability of countries, impedes efforts to combat poverty and makes the world economy more crisis-prone. Many people are losing their trust and confidence in the political system and feel like they have been left by it to twist in the wind. Inequality moreover cements the distribution of power and opportunities in society, threatening to become a Pandora's box over the long term.

Developments over the past few decades offer one explanation for the rise of conservative right-wing and populist movements: an economic system that benefits especially the top one per cent of humanity also explains disenchantment and political alienation among the remaining 99 per cent.

But how can this widening scissors movement be closed again? Recipes to date - structural reforms, more growth and redoubled efforts to combat poverty - are not having the desired effect. Inequality is not an engine of growth. On the contrary - it puts the brakes on economic development. In other words, more equal societies grow faster and better. And they have additional advantages: less crime, better health, less poverty. We want to have a wide-ranging, lively and open discussion about the impact of global inequality and how we can reverse this trend in a socially just manner over the long term with you and international experts, policy-makers, trade unionists and activists within the framework of this year's "International Week of Justice".

Week of Justice

Coordinator
Dr. Cäcilie Schildberg

Contact and Registration
Sergio Rakotozafy
gerechtigkeitswoche(at)fes.de

For registration, please specify in your email which events you would like to attend.

If you have any questions regarding barriers at individual events, please get in touch with us.

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Program of the International Week of Justice 2017

17:30 - 19:30
Conference Room 1, Haus 1 of FES

Unequal worlds - and why we need to take a closer look
Kick-Off Event

Why do some people possess more than they need and others too little? Inequality characterises not only wealth or income - it also afflicts other areas: access to education, political and social participation and, at the international level, relations between countries. But how much in the way of disparity are societies willing to tolerate? Why are disparities on the rise throughout the world? And what can we do to reduce injustice based on inequality between people and societies?

At the kick-off event for the FES 2017 International Week of Justice, international experts will provide an overview of developments and trends while exploring the roots of inequality - in particular with regard to income and wealth. At the same time, they will discuss what can be done politically to counter the negative consequences of inequality.

Following an introduction by Sanjay G. Reddy, New School for Social Research, moderator Wolf-Christian Ulrich, ZDF, will take the floor accompanied by Gesine Schwan, political scientist and member of the SPD, Roberto Bissio, Social Watch Uruguay, Marion Lieser, Oxfam, Gemma Adaba, international development consultant,  Dereje Alemayehu, chair of the Coordination Committee of the Global Alliance for Tax Justice, and Gianluca Grimalda, Kiel Institute for the World Economy.

Following this, "The Heavens" exhibition will be opened.

Event Languages: English and German

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19:30 - 20:00
Foyer, Haus 1 of FES

The Heavens: Annual Report
Exhibition Opening

Tax oases are at the nexus of injustice in the globalised economy. In discussions over tax avoidance and capital flight, these oases remain abstract notions, impenetrable und exotic. The pictures of Italian photographers Paolo Woods and Gabriele Galimberti give the global offshore business transactions of companies such as Apple, Starbucks or Coca-Cola tangible form, uncovering offshore letterbox companies and lending the actors a face. Their exhibition is the result of years of research that led them from Delaware to Jersey, from Singapore to Panama and through Luxembourg and the Netherlands.

www.theheavensllc.com

19:30 - 21:00
Conference Room 2, Haus 2 of FES

An elephant explains the world: unequal distribution of income
Panel Discussion

Asia is the winner - and the West the loser? The graphics designed by World Bank economist Branko Milanović showing global trends in income, which have become famous for their similarity to an elephant, create this impression. His work symbolises the economic stagnation of the middle classes in the Western industrialised countries and the rise of this strata in Asia, particularly in China. Measured in terms of income growth over the last few years, Asia's middle classes are the winner in globalisation. The income of the world's richest persons has also shot up. The losers, according to Milanović, are above all the middle classes of the Western industrialised countries and the poorest in the world. What explains this unequal development? Why is the income of many people stagnating, while the rich get richer? How are Western middle classes reacting to this? What is China doing to counter growing national disparities in income?

Gerhard Schröder, correspondent at the Berlin studio of Deutschlandradio, will discuss these topics with Zhang Haibing, Director, Institute for World Economy Studies, Shanghai Institutes for International Studies (SIIS), Dagmar Schmidt, member of the SPD Parliamentary Group, Stephan Klasen, economics professor at Göttingen University, Mark Schieritz, economic policy expert at DIE ZEIT, and  Stefan Pantekoek, FES Shanghai.

Event Languages: German and Chinese

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09:00 - 18:00
Foyer, Haus 1 of FES (closed 12:00-14:00 h)

The Heavens: Annual Report
Exhibition
for further information see above

17:30 - 19:30
6. floor, Haus 2 of FES

Earning by learning – is this the future of education in Africa?
Panel Discussion

Many elite learning institutions for children of rich parents are associated with private schools. But scarcely anyone thinks in this connection of slums in Sub-Saharan Africa. The fact of the matter is that "low-cost private schools" are booming there. One multinational corporation operates 400 schools for the poor in East Africa. Monthly tuition per child: six US dollars. Liberia is planning to completely privatise its dilapidated elementary and preschool system by 2020. The World Bank is also supporting these developments. The "business model school" is running up against increasing scepticism on the part of the government in Uganda, on the other hand, provoking an outcry from teachers' trade unions in many places.

What impact do "low-cost private schools" have on educational opportunities, conveyance of knowledge and democratic societies in Africa? What course of action should governments and actors adopt in the field of development cooperation? And how can the human right to education be put into practice?

These questions are to be discussed with Utz Dräger, journalist, by: Wilson Sossion, from the Kenyan teachers' trade union KNUT, Prof. Annette Scheunpflug, University of Bamberg, Angelo Gavrielatos, Education International, and others.

Event Languages: English and German

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19:00 - 20:30
Ibero-Amerikanisches Institut (IAI)

Inequality – a threat to stability and security in Latin America

The divide between poor and rich is particularly gaping in Latin America. The repercussions of this social inequality: In many countries, public security has become a very tenuous matter, with societies being riven by profound distrust. The police and judiciary are often inadequate to the task and unable to adequately respond to the challenges. But is a "tough-on-crime policy" and the earmarking of greater resources to security forces the right strategy to reduce violence and insecurity? What progressive approaches are there to improve public security in South America? What practical experience has been gained and what can be learnt from this?

Sabine Kurtenbach, GIGA Institut, will be addressing these questions with Markus-Michael Müller, Institute for Latin American Studies at Freie Universität Berlin, Denisse Legrand, coordinator of a project for young people at penal institutions in Uruguay and Frank Zimmermann, domestic political spokesman for the SPD Parliamentary Party Group in Berlin.

Event Languages: English and Spanish

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19:00 - 20:30
Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin - Otto-Braun-Saal

Another America - Another Europe
Panel Discussion

Numerous people in Europe and North America have doubts about the direction in which their countries are developing. Populist movements are growing but at the same time a vibrant commitment to democracy and cosmopolitanism can be observed in many countries. What is wrong with the existing models of globalization and development? Why is it that so many people, even in wealthier countries, feel left behind and ignored? How can broad-based growth in all countries be achieved while respecting the planetary boundaries? The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, adopted by the world’s heads of state and government at the United Nations in September 2015, represents a future-oriented response to the crisis of globalization. The group of the 20 largest industrialized and developing countries (G20) has also committed itself to implementing the 2030 Agenda at home and abroad. We do not yet know what the outcomes of the G20 summit in Hamburg will be. But it is obvious that a change of course is needed in Europe and America. For the US, Jeffrey Sachs has identified concrete paths leading to this goal in his most recent book Building the New American Economy. Gesine Schwan sees the EU in a crisis of solidarity and makes the case for a new start for Europe. SDSN Germany and the Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung cordially invite you to take part in the discussion.

Ali Aslan, journalist, will discuss these topics with Prof. Jeffrey Sachs, Director, Center for Sustainable Development and Gesine Schwan, political scientist and member of the SPD.

Event Languages: German and English

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09:00 - 18:00
Foyer, Haus 1 of FES (closed 12:00-14:00 h)

The Heavens: Annual Report
Exhibition

for further information see above

10:00 - 11:30
6. Floor, Haus 2 of FES

Freedom and justice – the Swedish model
Book presentation & discussion

When it comes to social justice, the world turns its eyes towards Sweden. Although inequality is on the rise there as well, the country has nevertheless developed a unique model of the welfare state. The foundation for this is a cultural collective - that is how the postulate goes. The historians Henrik Berggren and Lars Trägårdh refute this hypothesis in their book "Is the Swede a Human Being?". In it they trace the development of a system based on individualism, freedom and independence, discussing the repercussions for society and politics. Their conclusion: justice cannot only be attained through collectivism. It can also be reached just as effectively by "statist individualism", in which the state guaranties individuals an existence independently of family status or their origin based on the principle of equality among individuals.

Together with the author and journalist Julia Friedrichs, the two authors will be discussing  what Germany can learn from Sweden and which aspects of our social state ensure greater equality. It all revolves around individualism, family and the state as well as the question of how structural inequality can be prevented. The discussion will be moderated by Dr. Christian Krell, FES Stockholm.

Event Language: German and Swedish

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17:00 - 18:30
6. Floor, Haus 2 of FES

Inequality under scrutiny – options and limits of financial policy
Panel discussion

Inequality in income and wealth exacerbate not only social and individual problems - it also throttles growth. This has been demonstrated by recent empirical studies commissioned by the IMF and OECD. The global rise in income inequality is held to be one of the most important factors underlying the global financial and economic crisis. Hence, more equal distribution not only makes sense from the perspective of social accommodation - it would also promote economic growth.

How can inequality be confronted? Is tax policy the right instrument, or is this more of a cross-cutting task for all levels of policy? What instruments are available in a more just tax system?

Petra Pinzler, DIE ZEIT, will discuss these questions with Achim Truger, Berlin School of Economics and Law, Markus Henn, weed, Lothar Binding, Member of the SPD Parliamentary Group and Dierk Hirschel, ver.di.

Event Language: German

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17:30 - 19:45
Conference Room 2, Haus 2 of FES

Regions left behind - How economic policy has exacerbated inequality in the Maghreb
Discussion & film

The Maghreb states of Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia are also marked by mounting social inequalities. While living standards near the coast, in the capital cities and economic centres are relatively high, development is scarcely taking place in the south and interior of these countries. These regions lack jobs, education, health care, culture and security. At the same time, these regions play a major role in the exploitation of raw materials - petroleum, natural gas and phosphates - and in the export-oriented agricultural sector. But profits are channelled to the economic and political centres or outside the country. The consequence: migration, social unrest and growing extremism.

What impact do export-oriented development models have on the region? Can their marginalisation be reversed and what responsibility do European countries and the EU bear? Scholars and activists from the Maghreb states, including Abdelaziz Adidi, Ala Marzouki, Mounir Hassine, and Hamza Hamouchene, will be discussing these issues with Ilhem Brini, research assistant, FES Tunis.

Following the discussion is a screening of the film "Gabes Labess" from the Franco-Tunisian scholar and film-maker Habib Ayeb. In it he illustrates what consequences economic policy has for people, nature and traditional economic systems, taking the example of the Tunisian oasis region of Gabes.

Event Languages: French and German

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09:00 - 12:00
Foyer, Haus 1 of FES

The Heavens: Annual Report
Exhibition
for further information see above

17:00 - 20:00
Hackesche Höfe Kino

„Als Paul über das Meer kam – Tagebuch einer Begegnung“
Film & discussion

Access to mobility is distributed in an extremely unequal way. For people with money and the right nationality, the door to the world is wide open: a German passport is a visa-free admittance ticket to 177 countries, while for Cameroon the number is only half this many, with most of these countries offering similarly poor life prospects. Although the human right to freedom of movement also includes the right to leave a country, it does not encompass the right to enter a country. Strict entry regulations serve as invisible walls.

Jakob Preuss’ documentary film shows how difficult it is to travel without a privileged passport. "Als Paul über das Meer kam – Tagebuch einer Begegnung" ("When Paul came over the sea - journal of an encounter") tells the story of a man from Cameroon who travels to Europe. From West Africa, his travels, some of the time involving life-threatening situations, lead him through the forests of Morocco, to Spain, France and finally Berlin. The director accompanied Paul two years on his journey, during the course of which a complicated friendship developed.

Following the film, Felix Braunsdorf, FES, Jakob Preuss, director, Paul Nkamani, main protagonist, and Meike Riebau, Save the Children, will be discussing inequality, mobility and migration.

Screening in French with German subtitles; discussion in German

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